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New programme would allow witnesses to testify without attending court

UNICEF country representative to Guyana and Suriname, Sylvie Fouet, presents Chancellor of the Judiciary, Justice Yonette Cummings-Edwards, (fourth from right) with a part of the Skype System that was set up at the Vigilance Magistrate’s Court. Looking on are Chief Justice Roxane George, Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan and others from the judiciary UNICEF country representative to Guyana and Suriname, Sylvie Fouet, presents Chancellor of the Judiciary, Justice Yonette Cummings-Edwards, (fourth from right) with a part of the Skype System that was set up at the Vigilance Magistrate’s Court. Looking on are Chief Justice Roxane George, Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan and others from the judiciary

The judiciary in partnership with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has embarked on a programme to facilitate remote court participation which will see specialised areas being set up at hospitals, police stations and the prisons, to allow witnesses to testify without having to visit the courts.The judiciary in partnership with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has embarked on a programme to facilitate remote court participation which will see specialised areas being set up at hospitals, police stations and the prisons, to allow witnesses to testify without having to visit the courts.

Through the Partner-ships for Access to Justice Programme, survivors of domestic violence and victims of Trafficking in Persons will be allowed to provide evidence during trials without having to be present in a court room and possibly face their abuser.

On this note, the judiciary and UNICEF yesterday commissioned and presented the necessary audio-visual recording equipment to the Vigilance Magistrate’s Court. The equipment carries a cost of $1.5 Million.

Source: Stabroek News

Last modified on Friday, 31 January 2020 17:20
Written on Friday, 31 January 2020 Published in News Stories Read 478 times