Established in 1951, IOM is the leading inter-governmental organization in the field of migration and works closely with governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental partners. With 155 member states, a further 11 states holding observer status and offices in over 100 countries, IOM is dedicated to promoting humane and orderly migration for the benefit of all. It does so by providing services and advice to governments and migrants.
The United Nations Organization for Education, Science and Culture (UNESCO) was founded on 16 November 1945. UNESCO has 195 Members and eight Associate Members. It is governed by the General Conference and the Executive Board. The Secretariat, headed by the Director-General, implements the decisions of these two bodies. The Organization has more than 50 field offices around the world. Its headquarters are located at Place de Fontenoy in Paris, France, in in an outstanding, Modernist building inaugurated in 1958 and recently renovated. UNESCO works to create the conditions for dialogue among civilizations, cultures and peoples, based upon respect for commonly shared values. It is through this dialogue that the world can achieve global visions of sustainable development encompassing observance of human rights, mutual respect and the alleviation of poverty, all of which are at the heart of UNESCO’S mission and activities.
Rui Olivieira Reis Rui Olivieira Reis joined the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) in 2000. He was assigned to Georgetown, Guyana as the Chief of Mission in July 2009. Previously…
Document Summary: Although migration is not an MDG, migration can have an important impact on the achievement of the MDGs. For example, migrant remittances are more important than official development aid, and despite the global economic crisis, remain the second largest financial flow to developing countries after foreign direct investment. “Social remittances” – the skills, know-how, networks and other less tangible resources that migrants contribute to their families and communities – also have a direct impact on the prospects of individuals and their extended families in achieving development targets. Therefore, there is a strong case for factoring migration into plans…
Ms. Christine Norton has extensive international experience with a broad history in areas which include planning, policy, management and advocacy that advanced the rights of women and children and other groups in need. She has an M Sc in Law and Science from the University of London (UK) and a B.A. in Psychology and Geography from Mc Master University (Canada). Ms. Norton has held the following positions: Senior Advisor – Program Division (UNICEF), New York UNICEF Representative to Belize UNICEF Senior Advisor for Adolescent Development and Gender Equality, UNICEF Regional Office (Panama) Senior Advisor for Adolescent Development and Participation (UNICEF), UNODC, (Bangkok, Thailand) Consultant with UNAIDS/Caricom Community Secretariat Technical Officer in Resource Mobilization, Programme Planning, Research and Transfer of Technology with WHO Global Programme on AIDS (Geneva, Switzerland)
The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) works for: the elimination of discrimination against women and girls; empowerment of women; and achievement of…